emmysnacks

I live in southern New Hampshire with my husband, 2 year old son and 4 year old bulldog. I'm trying to find my way while doing the stay at home mom thing..

I like cooking, wine and reading. I'm always on the look out for new recipes and books to read.
froth:

Sir Patrick Stewart on His First-Ever Slice of Pizza: ‘My Fiancée and I Were a Little Hung-over’

The world was fascinated and confused yesterday when British transplant Sir Patrick Stewart tweeted a photo of himself eating his first slice of pizza in his 72 years of existence. In addition to this blog, the story made headlines at the Daily News, the Today show, Fox News, The Hollywood Reporter, USA Today, and countless other outlets. And everyone who wrote about it had the same question: How is this possible? 
So, I get that you’ve had pizza before, just not a slice of pizza …That’s correct. People misunderstood. There was a school of thought that I had eaten my first pizza, but of course how could that possibly be true? I would have had to have stayed locked up in a cellar. But nevertheless, this was my first slice of pizza, which I was only eating because my fiancée and I were a little hung-over yesterday morning and she said what we need is pizza and a soothing drink — and she was right. It solved the problem. But, in fact, it was my first slice, and when it was brought over to me, my first comment was “There’s no knife and fork.” Of course, I was mocked for thinking that I could eat a pizza slice with a knife and fork. 

Of course. Especially in a Brooklyn pizza restaurant. And so then I was instructed — because I was getting myself into a real mess — to do the fold, the classic New York fold technique, which we illustrated in the photograph. And, in fact, it proved effective. It kept me clean and unblemished. 


It was a good technique for a first-timer.Oh, well, thank you very much; that’s kind of you. But pizza was at one time a novelty in my life, and I’ll give you an instance. My brother and I, when we were small, we would listen to a BBC Radio program every morning called “Children’s Choice.” And they played records suitable for kids to listen to. My brother and I listened to this seriously — we learned all the lyrics to all the songs, and we sang along. And one of them was a Dean Martin hit called “Amore.” And the song began, “When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie.” Well, my brother and I had never seen a pizza, didn’t know what a pizza was; we had never heard the word before, so it made no sense to us. So I thought that what Dean Martin was actually singing was “When the moon hits your eye like a big piece of pie.” So for years, whenever I was singing along, I would sing those words, until one day somebody said, “What are you singing?” And I said, “A big piece of pie.” And he said, “Idiot, it’s pizza pie.” Because I was actually in my twenties before I saw a pizza. I know that will sound bizarre to you, but I grew up in a small community in northern England. 

Can you believe all the attention this has gotten?I’m astonished. You know, we thought it was a cute picture. I like doing these things that are kind of unexpected, as far as I’m concerned, and things that have a little bit of a surprise element to them. But we never anticipated what has happened. I just did an interview with BBC, the main evening news program. And it’s been years since I’ve talked to them. And it’s all, you know, about a pizza slice.

froth:

Sir Patrick Stewart on His First-Ever Slice of Pizza: ‘My Fiancée and I Were a Little Hung-over’

The world was fascinated and confused yesterday when British transplant Sir Patrick Stewart tweeted a photo of himself eating his first slice of pizza in his 72 years of existence. In addition to this blog, the story made headlines at the Daily News, the Today show, Fox News, The Hollywood Reporter, USA Today, and countless other outlets. And everyone who wrote about it had the same question: How is this possible?

So, I get that you’ve had pizza before, just not a slice of pizza …
That’s correct. People misunderstood. There was a school of thought that I had eaten my first pizza, but of course how could that possibly be true? I would have had to have stayed locked up in a cellar. But nevertheless, this was my first slice of pizza, which I was only eating because my fiancée and I were a little hung-over yesterday morning and she said what we need is pizza and a soothing drink — and she was right. It solved the problem. But, in fact, it was my first slice, and when it was brought over to me, my first comment was “There’s no knife and fork.” Of course, I was mocked for thinking that I could eat a pizza slice with a knife and fork. 

Of course. 
Especially in a Brooklyn pizza restaurant. And so then I was instructed — because I was getting myself into a real mess — to do the fold, the classic New York fold technique, which we illustrated in the photograph. And, in fact, it proved effective. It kept me clean and unblemished. 

It was a good technique for a first-timer.
Oh, well, thank you very much; that’s kind of you. But pizza was at one time a novelty in my life, and I’ll give you an instance. My brother and I, when we were small, we would listen to a BBC Radio program every morning called “Children’s Choice.” And they played records suitable for kids to listen to. My brother and I listened to this seriously — we learned all the lyrics to all the songs, and we sang along. And one of them was a Dean Martin hit called “Amore.” And the song began, “When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie.” Well, my brother and I had never seen a pizza, didn’t know what a pizza was; we had never heard the word before, so it made no sense to us. So I thought that what Dean Martin was actually singing was “When the moon hits your eye like a big piece of pie.” So for years, whenever I was singing along, I would sing those words, until one day somebody said, “What are you singing?” And I said, “A big piece of pie.” And he said, “Idiot, it’s pizza pie.” Because I was actually in my twenties before I saw a pizza. I know that will sound bizarre to you, but I grew up in a small community in northern England. 

Can you believe all the attention this has gotten?
I’m astonished. You know, we thought it was a cute picture. I like doing these things that are kind of unexpected, as far as I’m concerned, and things that have a little bit of a surprise element to them. But we never anticipated what has happened. I just did an interview with BBC, the main evening news program. And it’s been years since I’ve talked to them. And it’s all, you know, about a pizza slice.

(via unicornzzzzz)

April 2nd. Feels like a good day to take down the remainder of the Christmas decorations. 

(Note the snow. This thing has been frozen to the ground for months, so I couldn’t have taken it down much sooner than this if I wanted to.)

April 2nd. Feels like a good day to take down the remainder of the Christmas decorations. (Note the snow. This thing has been frozen to the ground for months, so I couldn’t have taken it down much sooner than this if I wanted to.)

Hey @kgee19 can you send your basil plant over to give mine a pep talk?

Hey @kgee19 can you send your basil plant over to give mine a pep talk?

Just so you all know, I spotted all of the spotted newts in next month’s New Hampshire magazine and have been entered to win two pounds of composting worms. 

Boom. In your faces. 

What has my life become????

Just so you all know, I spotted all of the spotted newts in next month’s New Hampshire magazine and have been entered to win two pounds of composting worms.

Boom. In your faces.

What has my life become????

king-satan-senpai:

lifehackable:

Stretches that improve different aspects of your body.

i hate lower pain pain. bless this.

(via sweep)

sassyyogi:

Yoga for Runners!!

I have been getting a couple of asks about the kind of stretches for runners, so I have decided to do a yoga guide on this <: this is a great way to cool down and stretch out your leg muscles and hips after a good run!

1. Passive Standing Forward Bend

Holding on to opposite elbows and with your feet shoulder distance apart, slowly drape your torso over your legs. Slowly sway from side to side, opening up your hamstrings and calves. As you exhale, slowly deepen your stretch. 

2. Wide-Legged Standing Forward Bend

Widening your stance, deepen your stretch by using your peace fingers to grab on to your big toes. As you exhale, pull your torso towards your legs, feeling a nice stretch at the back of your legs. 

3 & 4. Low Lunge & Lizard Pose

These are poses that help you stretch your hip flexors. For lizard pose, use a yoga block if it gets a little too intense for you. You do not have to get down on to your forearms. You can be on your palms if that feels good for you. 

5 & 6. Pigeon Pose & Mermaid Pose

Both are passive hip openers, so feel free to stay in your pigeon pose for as long as it feels good. You can also go into resting pigeon pose, with your torso draped over your front leg, resting on your forehead. 

If your hips feel open and good, come into a mermaid pose to stretch your sides and deepen the stretching of your hips. 

7, 8, and 9. Downward Dog & Three Legged Dog Variations

Downward dog is a great pose to stretch out your calves. As you come into your downward dog, try to melt your chest towards the ground, and make sure your arm pits are pointing towards the ground and not flayed outwards. Reach your back heel towards the ground, and you’ll feel a nice stretch on your calves. 

To deepen your stretch, come into the three legged dog. Feel free to open your hips in your three legged dog. This not only stretches your calves but also opens up your hips. 

10. Seated Forward Fold

End off with a seated forward fold. Try not to round your back too much by shifting your gaze to your shins or toes rather than your knees. As you inhale, straighten your back. As you exhale, melt your torso towards your legs. 

Feel free to come into a child’s pose or savasana to end off your stretches if that feels good <:

-

This is a great cooldown routine after a good run! <: Have fun! Namaste <3

I do yoga. I do running. I should probably do yoga for running.

(via fuckyeahyoga)

(Source: melodyismyname, via megwhat)

americastestkitchen:

Make Homemade Corn Dogs for the Best Baseball-Watching Season Ever
A Snack-on-a-Stick Recipe From Cook’s Country
Why This Recipe Works: To re-create this crowd favorite at home, we made a light batter with flour, cornmeal, buttermilk, and eggs. Coating the skewered hot dogs in flour before batter-dipping ensures the batter adheres to the hot dogs. To make coating the hot dogs easy, we transfer the batter to a tall drinking glass for even, hassle free dunking.
MAKES 8 CORN DOGS
Ingredients are linked to our official taste tests and favorite products.
1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 3/4 cups buttermilk 4 large eggs, lightly beaten 8 hot dogs 3 quarts peanut or vegetable oil
1. Set wire rack inside rimmed baking sheet. Whisk cornmeal, 1 cup flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, salt, and cayenne together in bowl. Whisk in buttermilk and eggs until incorporated. Place remaining 1/2 cup flour in shallow dish. Dredge hot dogs in flour and shake to remove excess. Thread hot dogs lengthwise onto eight 8-inch skewers.
2. Add oil to large Dutch oven until it measures about 2 inches deep and heat over medium-high heat to 350 degrees. Stir batter to recombine, then transfer half of batter to tall drinking glass. Working with one at a time, submerge hot dog in glass and twirl to coat with batter. Allow excess batter to drip back into glass and place corn dog in hot oil. Repeat immediately with 3 more hot dogs. Fry corn dogs, turning occasionally, until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer to wire rack. Return oil to 350 degrees and repeat with remaining batter and hot dogs. Serve.
Related: 5 Buttermilk Questions You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

OMG! Relevant to my life.

americastestkitchen:

Make Homemade Corn Dogs for the Best Baseball-Watching Season Ever

A Snack-on-a-Stick Recipe From Cook’s Country

Why This Recipe Works: To re-create this crowd favorite at home, we made a light batter with flour, cornmeal, buttermilk, and eggs. Coating the skewered hot dogs in flour before batter-dipping ensures the batter adheres to the hot dogs. To make coating the hot dogs easy, we transfer the batter to a tall drinking glass for even, hassle free dunking.

MAKES 8 CORN DOGS

Ingredients are linked to our official taste tests and favorite products.

1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 3/4 cups buttermilk
4 large eggs, lightly beaten
hot dogs
3 quarts peanut or vegetable oil

1. Set wire rack inside rimmed baking sheet. Whisk cornmeal, 1 cup flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, salt, and cayenne together in bowl. Whisk in buttermilk and eggs until incorporated. Place remaining 1/2 cup flour in shallow dish. Dredge hot dogs in flour and shake to remove excess. Thread hot dogs lengthwise onto eight 8-inch skewers.

2. Add oil to large Dutch oven until it measures about 2 inches deep and heat over medium-high heat to 350 degrees. Stir batter to recombine, then transfer half of batter to tall drinking glass. Working with one at a time, submerge hot dog in glass and twirl to coat with batter. Allow excess batter to drip back into glass and place corn dog in hot oil. Repeat immediately with 3 more hot dogs. Fry corn dogs, turning occasionally, until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer to wire rack. Return oil to 350 degrees and repeat with remaining batter and hot dogs. Serve.

Related: 5 Buttermilk Questions You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

OMG! Relevant to my life.

"Look at me! I&#8217;m a robot!"

"Look at me! I’m a robot!"